Symposium will address Alzheimer’s disease from all sides

March 20, 2015


Dementia from All Sides
2015 Spring Symposium Registration

Sid O'Bryant
Sid O’Bryant
Janice Knebl
Janice Knebl

Every day, UNT Health Science Center researchers are studying ways to better understand Alzheimer’s disease and how it can be treated or prevented.

At the “Dementia from All Sides 2015 Spring Symposium” presented by the Alzheimer’s Association, several UNTHSC scientists will share their latest research on the disease and the importance of clinical trials.

The March 26 event is from 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Riley Conference Center, 1700 West Fuller Ave., and is designed for family caregivers and professionals.

“Advancement in science is our best hope for a world without Alzheimer’s disease,” said Sid O’Bryant, PhD, Interim Director of the Institute of Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine.

His presentation will address the role of clinical trials in the quest to find new treatments.

“I’ll be delivering an update on advancements in the science, where research is headed and give the lay public an idea of what they can expect in terms of Alzheimer’s disease,” he said.

The evolution of Alzheimer’s disease will be presented by Janice Knebl, DO, MBA, who as Chief of Geriatric Medicine at UNT Health Science Center, sees firsthand the impact that dementia has on people.

Also appearing at the symposium is Susan Franks, PhD, Associate Professor of Family Medicine, a clinical psychologist who will offer activities for brain health that can help seniors experience greater well-being.

The link between dementia and depression has long been studied by Leigh Johnson, PhD, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, who will share her findings on this topic during a breakout session during the symposium.

Amy Moss, DO, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, who specializes in geriatrics, will discuss the diagnosis, treatment and care of patients with frontotemporal dementia. Dr. Moss sees patients with dementia on a daily basis and will offer insight into the needs of individuals and families facing the disease.

The event is free to family caregivers, $90 for professionals needing continuing education credit and $50 for professionals not needing CEUs. For more information, call 1-800-272-3900.

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