Psychologist incorporates yoga into psychotherapy sessions

September 30, 2014

When you think of a psychologist’s office, what do you envision? A couch? Book-lined walls? A box of tissues?

How about a yoga mat?

If it’s the office of UNT Health Science Center’s Mandy Jordan, PhD, that’s exactly what you’ll find.

Dr. Jordan’s psychotherapy sessions incorporate yoga and the mind-body connection.

“Research indicates that trauma, depression, anxiety have an impact on the brain and the body,” she said. “Therefore, in my opinion, the benefit of traditional talk therapy is limited if the body is not included.”

Her therapy is completely individualized and based on her patients’ problems, beliefs and receptivity. For example, some of her patients have a physical injury, body ache or a chronic health condition.

She teaches patients different stretches or yoga postures that may strengthen, elongate or ease tension in the affected area.

“While my patients do physical exercises that target the area of tension or pain, we talk about the issues related to that area of the body,” explained Dr. Jordan, Assistant Professor of  Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. “Interestingly, as that area is physically addressed, I find patients develop better insights and emotional release about their particular problem.  In addition, regardless of the problem, I almost always teach the diaphragmatic breathing, grounding techniques, and tools to help the patient stay in the present moment – all important factors in yoga.”

Research supports her belief. In a study published in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, patients with histories of trauma who practiced trauma-sensitive yoga as part of their therapy showed significantly more improvement in symptoms than those who just participated in group-therapy sessions.

For more information or to make an appointment with Dr. Jordan, contact 817-702-3100.

Jerry Simecka
Relieving the pain of peripheral arterial disease

By Jan Jarvis [caption id="attachment_200398685" align="alignright" width="200"] Dr. Jin Liu[/caption] For someone with peripheral arterial disease – a condition that causes narrowing of arteries in the limbs - pain is a big problem. “The treatment for it is exercise,” said Eric G...Read more

Jul 19, 2018

Heath Fc
Protecting her daughters’ generation from Alzheimer’s

By Alex Branch Janet Heath has a deeply personal interest in Alzheimer’s disease. Her mother suffered from it, as did her grandmother. Heath spent the last 10 years of her mother’s life trying to coordinate high-quality care as the disease took its terrible toll. That’s why Heath and ...Read more

Jul 17, 2018

Sid Fc
A blood test that IDs Alzheimer’s earlier, easier and cheaper

By Jan Jarvis   The first study of a blood test to detect Alzheimer’s disease within a primary care setting soon will be conducted at UNT Health Science Center. The simple test could be a game-changer in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer’s. If successful, it would be possible to ide...Read more

Jul 12, 2018

Dr. Taylor
New Provost: Let’s ‘unleash our strengths and ignite our future’

By Jeff Carlton Charles Taylor, PharmD, who has presided over a number of critical academic milestones as Dean of the UNT System College of Pharmacy, will become Provost and Executive Vice President of Academic Affairs at UNT Health Science Center. Dr. Taylor said he was “excited, honore...Read more

Jul 11, 2018