Early findings of innovative study of Alzheimer’s among diverse populations available to dementia researchers

June 22, 2021

Dr. Sid O'Bryant

Sid O’Bryant, PhD

 

A growing trove of data to help scientists understand the biology of Alzheimer’s disease among diverse populations within the context of sociocultural, behavioral and environmental factors is now available through the Institute for Translational Research at The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth (HSC).

The research data is the result of the Health and Aging Brain among Latino Elders (HABLE) study launched in 2017 with $12 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health and headed by Sid O’Bryant, PhD, Executive Director of the Institute.

In 2020, the HABLE study received an additional $45 million from National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. O’Bryant announced the availability of the research data in article published June 21 in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring, a national journal published by the Alzheimer’s Association.

“The data from this study is a first-of-a-kind for the field,” Dr. O’Bryant said. “We will for the first time be able to examine the biology of Alzheimer’s among Mexican Americans as well as non-Hispanic whites all within the context of sociocultural, environmental and behavioral factors. Scientists from across the globe can use this data to address health disparities and define new diagnostic and treatment opportunities for underserved communities.”

The percentage of Hispanics 65 and above in the U.S. will triple by the year 2050 and, when compared to other racial or ethnic groups, are expected to experience the largest increase in Alzheimer’s disease related dementias by 2060, according to the paper. About 65 percent of U.S. Hispanics are of Mexican decent.

However, Mexican Americans are severely underrepresented in Alzheimer’s research, resulting too few comprehensive studies of the biomarkers of the disease among this population. Early findings suggest that beta amyloid protein — one of the biomarkers of Alzheimer’s — is less common among Mexican Americans yet Mexican Americans seem to have a younger onset of cognitive loss.

About 1,000 Mexican Americans and 1,000 non-Latino whites over 50 from North Texas have enrolled in the study that gives participants reoccurring and free comprehensive interviews, functional exams, clinical laboratory tests, a brain MRI and state-of-the-art PET Scans.

The PET Scans allow researchers to observe the differences over time in the development of the biomarkers between Mexican Americans and non-Latino whites.

In December, HSC announced an additional $7 million investment that to add 1,000 African Americans to the study. Among people 65 and older, African Americans have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease, followed by Hispanics and non-Latino whites, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

The project is the only comprehensive, large-scale Alzheimer’s research study into the three largest ethnic groups in the U.S. – Non-Hispanic whites, Mexican Americans and African Americans.


Contact the Institute for Translational Research at HSC


 

Emanuel George 666 X 750
College of Pharmacy faculty member inspires greatness, one student at a time

Dr. Emanuel George, III, aka “DrEG3,” is on a mission to impact and serve 1 million people. He is well on his way, advocating for students, alumni and the greater pharmacy community. “I believe that I am a servant to all people,” Dr. George said. “I hope to help people become and li...Read more

Dec 2, 2021

Magdalena Bus and Bruce Budowle
Dr. Bruce Budowle named as UNT System Regents Professor

By Sally Crocker Over the years, Bruce Budowle, PhD, has been recognized in various ways for his lifelong dedication to uncovering mysteries, bringing long-sought answers to families and communities, and developing novel ways to improve the science behind forensic medicine. After spending...Read more

Dec 1, 2021

Dr. Nolan Kline, School of Public Health
This HSC faculty member is taking action to help address social problems

By Sally Crocker Nolan Kline, PhD, is the kind of person who can’t sit by when action is needed. A defining moment early in his college experience led Dr. Kline to a career in public health education, research and service, and as a new faculty member in the HSC School of Public Health, h...Read more

Nov 23, 2021

Dr. Christopher Hull, TCOM alum
The healing power of hats: How one TCOM alum brings smiles to faces with his unique collection

By Steven Bartolotta In 1998, Christopher Hull, DO and 1979 Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine alum, was wearing a signature hat from his vast collection, as he walked through a hospital hallway. A patient came up to him and asked if he was wearing a welder’s hat. “Yes,” said...Read more

Nov 22, 2021