Posted Date: January 11, 2018
UNT Health Science Center Cowntown Billboard - Get off the fence. Get movin'. Proud founder of the Cowtown Marathon

 

Inspiring and educating people toward healthier lives is what UNT Health Science Center is all about. As we start a new year, there is no better time to prioritize health and wellness. So we hope our message of “Get ’em off the fence. Get movin’!” inspires our community toward more physical activity . . . and participation in Fort Worth’s annual Cowtown Marathon events.

UNT Health Science Center helped establish the Cowtown Marathon, a 26-mile race that has been an annual highlight of Fort Worth winters since 1979. The race’s initial purpose was to promote fitness and nutrition for Fort Worth residents, an approach well-suited to UNTHSC physicians, who took a holistic approach to health long before it became a mainstay of medicine.

The 40th Cowtown Marathon will be Feb. 23-25, 2018. The weekend event hosts six distance races, involves 4,300 volunteers and attracts some 28,000 runners from Texas and beyond. Its charity, the Cowtown C.A.L.F. Program, impacts some 18,000 youth in the community each year by offering running training to schools across Fort Worth, as well as race entry-fee grants and new running shoes to qualifying children in need.

Posted Date: January 3, 2017
UNTHSC Cowtown Billboard

 

We are proud to be part of such a vibrant and unique community. With traditions going back more than one hundred years, like the Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo, and newer additions like The Cowtown Marathon and a focus on creativity and beauty through public works of art, we believe there’s no other place quite like Fort Worth.

The originality of our city is embodied in its people and its institutions… like the UNT Health Science Center that was founded in 1970 with the opening of the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. Now, UNTHSC has grown to be one of the nation’s premier graduate academic medical centers, with five schools that specialize in patient-centered education, research and health care. Next, we’ll be adding Fort Worth’s MD school in collaboration with TCU as well as a new state-of-the-art research building. Our growth is a commitment to providing solutions for a healthier Fort Worth and beyond.

The Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo, established in 1896, is one of the oldest livestock shows in the U.S. It is also Fort Worth’s largest annual event, drawing more than 1 million visitors each year. The 23 days of “western heritage and Texas tradition” in January and February, create an economic impact of over $100 million annually with all profits either returned to the city in the form of facility improvements or used for advanced education. Always a winter tradition, this year’s Stock Show will begin Jan. 9 and run through Feb. 4, 2017.

The Cowtown Marathon weekend of six distance races, scheduled to run Feb. 24-26, 2017, will celebrate its 40th year in 2018. The event involves 4,300 volunteers annually and attracts some 28,000 runners from across Texas, the U.S. and internationally. Its charity, the Cowtown C.A.L.F. Program, impacts some 18,000 youth in the community each year by offering running training to schools across Fort Worth, as well as race entry-fee grants and new running shoes to qualifying children in need.

The Cowtown Mural

Cowtown Mural

 

The artwork used in our latest billboard is a sampling of a mural located on the exterior of The Cowtown Marathon’s administrative office located at 2717 Whitmore in Fort Worth’s new Foundry District.

The building is owned by M2G Ventures who commissioned the public art piece by local artist Katie Murray. Twin TCU graduates Susan Gruppi and Jessica Worman founded their commercial real estate company in 2014 and include some type of public art at each of their projects.

Artist Katie Murray has collaborated with M2G Ventures to create inspiring and thought-provoking public works of art on four commercial buildings around Fort Worth. When not painting murals, Murray is a portrait artist and recently opened a gallery at 2708 Wisenberger.

Posted Date: February 16, 2016
Running buddies since 1979. Proud founder of The Cowtown. UNTHSC

 

Early Cowtown marathon starting line

The race has grown, after more than 35 years, to include more than 30,000 runners.

Running a marathon takes perseverance, dedication and discipline.

But establishing your own marathon? That takes those attributes and more: vision, confidence and boldness.

Those are precisely the qualities that led UNT Health Science Center to establish the Cowtown Marathon, a 26-mile race that has been an annual highlight of Fort Worth winters since 1979. The race’s initial purpose was to promote fitness and nutrition for Fort Worth residents, an approach well-suited to UNTHSC physicians, who took a holistic approach to health long before it became a mainstay of medicine.

Marathon runner from early Cowtown Marathon, running past UNTHSC campus

Early runnings of the Cowtown began in the Stockyards and wound through the campus.

TCOM President Ralph Willard with Cowtown winner Bill Parmalee and sponsor Jody Grant.

TCOM President Ralph Willard with Cowtown winner Bill Parmalee and sponsor Jody Grant.

About 460 hearty runners signed up for that initial Cowtown – 210 for the marathon and another 250 for the 10K, then the event’s only other race. The Cowtown has since grown to become the largest multi-race running event in Texas, with more than 30,000 participants and 10 races, including an ultra marathon, a half marathon and 5Ks for adults and children.

The Health Science Center has been a part of this journey every step of the way, first as a founder and now as a proud sponsor. And UNTHSC involvement goes beyond just a financial commitment.

Darrin D’Agostino, DO, Associate Dean of Community Health, will once again serve as race’s medical director for this year’s races, overseeing a volunteer team of Health Science Center physicians and medical students at 24 first aid stations across the course. UNTHSC physicians also will staff a medical tent and ICU area to treat and triage sports injuries, hypothermia, acute events and anything else that comes up during the race.

We have a booth at the Cowtown Expo, where our students and faculty will provide osteopathic manipulative medicine and testing for balance, movement, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, bone density and body composition.

The Health Science Center is committed to doing our part for a healthy Fort Worth. We’re proud of our 38-year history with the Cowtown marathon and eager in 2016 to once again run stride for stride with our city’s signature race.

 

Posted Date: June 1, 2015
June_Billboard1_FullArt

Where Innovation dwells

For more than 40 years, UNT Health Science Center has been an innovator in training health care professionals, in pushing the frontiers of scientific knowledge and in improving public health.

 

Ten areas of innovation and excellence

The silver tsunami
Our researchers are focused on ways to confront the so-called “silver tsunami,” the growing number of Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other ailments of the aging.In the next decade, the number of Alzheimer’s cases is expected to soar by 44 percent, rising to more than 7 million people by 2030 and threatening to cripple the country’s health care system.A highly reliable blood test to detect Alzheimer’s currently is being developed in our labs and could be a key to early diagnosis – and more effective treatment.

Compassionate cancer treatment
Traditional treatments like chemotherapy or radiation often pose a debilitating ordeal for cancer patients. Our researchers are making great strides in helping change that by pioneering drug-delivery systems that target cancer cells while leaving normal cells alone.

DNA superstars
Our DNA forensic DNA experts are tops in the nation, trusted colleagues of law enforcement agencies across the United States who regularly seek their expertise to aid in violent-crime investigations and to identify human remains. The Center for Human Identification is the largest contributor of DNA profiles to the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS.

Treating society’s most vulnerable
From the beginning, UNTHSC has focused efforts on providing health care to the most vulnerable elements of the Fort Worth community – its young and its old. Our Pediatric Mobile Clinic brings basic health care to children in four underserved neighborhoods of the city. Our Mighty Care Program targets Medicaid-eligible seniors, offering primary care services through free-standing neighborhood clinics. In addition, our medical students and volunteer physicians treat the homeless at regular clinics at the Presbyterian Night Shelter and in other community settings.

Primary care
Long before primary care became a linchpin in national health policy, UNTHSC was one of the top producers of primary care physicians in the nation. Today, more than 60 percent of our Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine graduates enter primary care. Many stay to practice in Texas, helping alleviate the state’s critical shortage of doctors.

The importance of teamwork
Medical education is being transformed by the recognition that that cooperation and coordination in providing health care to an individual patient can reduce medical errors, control costs and provide optimum care. And UNTHSC is at the forefront of that movement. From their first day of classes, our health care students are trained to work across disciplines to keep the patient at the center of care decisions.

Training health professionals
As the demand for health care grows, so does the need to train health professionals to help carry the load. Our health professional programs produce physical therapists and physician assistants that work side-by-side with physicians to meet the needs of their patients. The physician assistant profession, in particular, is booming. Since 2006, there has been a 34 percent increase in the number of people entering the field.

Meeting the need for rural doctors
In many areas of rural Texas, health care providers are few and far between. To address that need, UNTHSC created Rural Osteopathic Medical Education of Texas, or ROME, which sends student physicians into rural settings where they can experience first-hand the rewards of practicing medicine in places where the need is greatest.

Safeguarding the public’s health
The world is a dangerous place. As people and food move more easily across borders, an unwelcome side effect is the ease with which illnesses can move rapidly from remote villages to population centers. Poor sanitation, environment impact and a lack of health resources encourage the rise of new diseases in remote corners of the globe that can impact the health of Americans. To combat that, UNTHSC is training public health experts to improve the conditions and behaviors that affect the health of us all.

A culture based on values
We have committed ourselves to creating a culture at UNTHSC based on values that all our team members hold dear. Those values, by which this University will be governed and by which we will be judged, were developed through a bottom-up, grassroots effort in which every team member was encouraged to participate. The values are Serving Others First, Integrity, Respect, Collaboration and Be Visionary.