ROME Student Feedback

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“ROME has provided me with an unparalleled medical school education. Working one on one with my preceptors has allowed me to receive more individualized feedback, and given me the opportunity to participate directly in patient care since the beginning of my clinicals. I’ve had the opportunity to perform many different procedures ranging from catching a baby, to suturing, to lumbar punctures. Furthermore, I feel confident in my choice of specialty because I was included in my preceptor’s family events, community events, and more in each rotation. ROME gave me broad clinical experience and insight into each specialty through which I rotated. My experience in Thailand greatly enriched my time in medical school. Spending a whole month immersed in the health care system of a different country was eye-opening. Not only were the doctors receptive to teaching and answering questions, but they even demonstrated some of the traditional treatments on us so we would understand them better. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about Thai culture and medicine and feel it has broadened my worldview and knowledge of alternative and traditional medical treatments.” Current Student Doctor YR4

 

“I think the skills labs that the ROME  faculty set up helped prepare me more than anything for my year three and four rotations. The extra training we received in various suturing techniques, joint injections, central line placement, and virtual colonoscopies was wonderful. Furthermore, I believe my patient interviewing skills were strengthened by participating in the ROME program.”-Current Student Doctor YR4

 

“Through ROME I was given the skills as well as the opportunity to complete a rotation in Lilongwe, Malawi.  It was a fantastic experience that illustrated the health struggles of developing countries, and it taught me a lot about medicine as well as my own professional goals.  The varied hospital experiences ranged from working in the pediatric wards, to delivering babies or performing ultrasound examinations, all without the use of what would be considered basic equipment in the United States.  Outside of the hospital we participated in HIV and epilepsy clinics that cater specifically to those major issues facing Malawians.  Lastly, I got to understand the culture and aid in the support of local feeding centers and school in a non-medical role, which helped me connect with their culture on a deeper level.  This experience not only completely aligned with my passions of serving the underserved, but it illuminated how a future of rural and international medicine could contribute to each other, and I am now aware of the steps I should take to ensure that both are a part of my future.” Current Student Doctor YR3

 

“My favorite part of third year was meeting different people all over Texas. At each site I made a unique friendship, whether it was my preceptor or a nursing home resident. My favorite experience was in Gatesville, Texas. I usually got to the hospital, rounded on my preceptor’s patients, dictated notes, and came up with treatment plans before he arrived. We would then round together, go over my plan and implement what we thought was best for each patient. Once this was done we would usually visit patients/friends we made in the nursing home connected to the hospital. We usually finished each day by playing bass and guitar together in his office. It was the best internal medicine experience I could ask for and I’ll always remember it.”-Current Student Doctor YR3 

 

“It would be impossible to overstate how important the insight from my preceptor has been in my trajectory as a medical student pursuing rural Family Medicine. Over 5 months, I have learned more than clinical skills: how to build lasting relationships with patients in a small town, economical approaches to practice that benefit low-income patients, and how to balance managing a practice with having a family.”-Current Student Doctor YR4

 

“In my time rotating as a rural student I have been astounded and humbled by the kindness shown to me by people at every rotation.  In our society today it seems that too often we put people into groups and categories, and then simply sum them up as X or Y, blue or red, this or that.  Being thrown into new environments, new situations, and new micro-cultures has shown me the deep complexity of people, social interaction, and the human condition.  I feel honored to have been welcomed into so many lives, and freely given respect, friendship, and fellowship from so many diverse people in so many diverse places.”

“This will be what I carry with me from my rotations – that nearly all people are basically good and are simply waiting for the opportunity to show you their kindness and love.”-Current Student Doctor YR3

 

“ROME has provided me with an unparalleled medical school education. Working one on one with my preceptors has allowed me to receive more individualized feedback, and given me the opportunity to participate directly in patient care since the beginning of my clinicals. I’ve had the opportunity to perform many different procedures ranging from catching a baby, to suturing, to lumbar punctures. Furthermore, I feel confident in my choice of specialty because I was included in my preceptor’s family events, community events, and more in each rotation. ROME gave me broad clinical experience and insight into each specialty through which I rotated.”-Current Student Doctor YR4

 

For those considering rural medicine, I think the best way to explore an interest in rural medicine is obviously to have exposure in the field. Being from a rural community is helpful, because you’re already aware that Dairy Queen may be the only fast food option, and if you’re not there by 9:00 PM you’re out of luck. While rural medicine does differ from metropolitan medicine in some aspects, I think great medicine is great medicine regardless of the location. I would encourage prospective medical students who are not from a rural community to live in a rural area for at least 2 consecutive weeks and experience questionable cell phone service, Friday night football games, and dirt roads. The Rural Scholars program opened my eyes to the full spectrum of medicine that a qualified, competent physician can practice in rural Texas.”-ROME Alumnus

 

“I chose to participate in the Rural Scholars program for a multitude of reasons. First and foremost, I felt the program would better prepare me to practice medicine in the rural setting. I felt that the hands-on procedural training and extra time spent with trained patients would make me a better, more well-rounded physician. The rural third and fourth year rotations were also a significant draw for me. Indeed, the skills labs proved to be beneficial, as I was often able to outperform my peers later in the operating room during my surgical rotations. I also felt more at ease when interviewing patients, because of the extra time I spent during my first two years of medical school with the Rural Scholars program. I believe my experience at the rural training sites is what I have enjoyed the most about the Rural Scholars program. My rotations have taken me to Plainview, Lubbock, Crockett, Stephenville, Dublin, and Nacogdoches. There is no question that the one-on-one training provides a better medical education. I was given much more autonomy, exposure, and hands-on training than my peers were who  were completing rotations in the city. I have performed heart catheterizations and angioplasties, delivered babies, and been first assistant on multiple surgeries – all of which would not have been possible without the Rural Scholars program. I have also developed deeply personal relationships with my attendings not only as teachers and mentors, but as friends that I will forever cherish.” –ROME Alumnus

 

“It will consume time…but if you have any desire at all to serve as a physician in a rural community, in a third world country, or just in a family practice designed to allow you to do more than just refer and do basic outpatient care, then this is the program to commit to. By the time you’re a fourth year students and looking back, you will realize that you’d be completely ill-prepared for the future had you not done ROME. No Metroplex training can adequately prepare you for the role of a rural physician. Thanks for all your hard work [faculty and staff]. I’d say it’s all paid off.” -ROME Alumnus

 

“ROME helped me to better understand rural communities and the unique advantages and struggles of rural physicians. The extra training in procedures was highly beneficial…and the one-on-one training was the greatest benefit.” -ROME Alumnus 

This page was last modified on April 10, 2017