Narcan Training

students working with a simulation dummy


Bobbie Bratton with student demonstrating narcan on a simulation dummyIn response to a surge in opioid overdoses, the City of Fort Worth has awarded a $310,339 grant to The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. This crucial funding will enable HSC to expand its comprehensive opioid intervention education programs across the community. In 2022, Fort Worth experienced a three-year high in overdoses, with MedStar Mobile Health treating as many as three patients a day in August alone.

Through this grant, HSC will continue to develop and implement educational programs targeting various community groups. These programs are a collaborative effort, leveraging the expertise of SaferCare Texas clinical executives, and faculty and students from the HSC School of Public Health and College of Nursing.

Read more about the grant.

a student practicing narcan administration on a simulation dummy

Training

Twenty-five in-person and 10 virtual reality train-the-trainer sessions will be held to increase awareness about the dangers of opioids, educate individuals about how to recognize and respond to overdoses, and provide resources for those seeking help with addiction. Participants will receive training on how to administer naloxone. Once trained, participants will be able to train other member organizations, members and partners to effectively abate opioid overdose deaths.

Life-saving resources also will be distributed during the training sessions. This will include 600 naloxone kits and 1,500 drug disposal bags, resulting in 25 organizational readiness kits to support effective implementation. This outreach effort aims to maximize the impact of the program and ensure its long-term sustainability.

Use this training link to register for upcoming training or request a training at your facility or event and access the toolkit below.



Toolkit Materials and Resources


Fort Worth and the longhorn silhouette

Hsc Safer Care Texas

HSC School of Public Health