TCOM ranks in U.S. News & World Report’s top 50

The Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM) was ranked 43rd in primary care this year, according to 2009 rankings from U.S. News & World Report, marking the college’s seventh consecutive appearance in the top 50. 

 "A leader in the education of primary care physicians, the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine has earned national recognition for its curriculum reform, the use of medical simulation for training and a unique program to prepare primary care physicians to treat rural Texans," said Marc B. Hahn, DO, dean of the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. "This continued recognition exemplifies the quality of our graduates and the quality of our programs for training the medical professionals of the future."

Approximately 76 percent of TCOM’s graduates entered primary care programs from 2005 to 2007 – the third highest percentage among the top 50 schools. The other two Texas medical schools ranked in the top 50 for primary care, Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, had 43 percent and 42 percent respectively of their graduates enter primary care during the same period.

Each year, U.S.News & World Report ranks professional school programs in business, education, engineering, law and medicine. The rankings are based on expert opinion about program performance and statistical indicators that measure the quality of the school’s faculty, research and students.

To gather the opinion data, U.S. News & World Report surveyed deans, program directors and senior faculty to judge the academic quality of programs in their field on a scale of 1, which was marginal, to 5, which was outstanding. Professionals who hire new graduates were also surveyed for the rankings.

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