TCOM ranks among top medical schools for 16th straight year


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By Alex Branch

For the 16th consecutive year, the medical school at UNT Health Science Center was nationally recognized by U.S. News & World Report for primary care.

With 60 percent of the class of 2017 TCOM graduates entering primary care medicine, the school’s focus on helping everyday Texans access quality health care services is critical to resolving the state’s ongoing shortage of physicians.

Texas currently has about 43,000 physicians practicing patient care for a population of about 23 million, which ranks the state 45th nationally in the number of physicians per population, according to the Texas Medical Association.

“We are proud to be recognized for our impact training physicians skilled in comprehensive primary care and rural medicine,” said Don N. Peska, DO, MEd, Dean of TCOM. “Our students, faculty and staff work together every day to create health care strategies that will benefit current and future patients in Texas and beyond.”

TCOM’s innovative medical curriculum, cutting-edge research, quality patient care and outstanding student performance make the school’s graduates highly sought by elite graduate medical education programs in Texas and across the U.S.

TCOM’s Rural Medical Education program (ROME), offer focused experiences to prepare participants for life and practice in rural environments.

In addition to primary care, class of 2017 graduates matched into a broad array of specialties at top programs, including Mayo Clinic, Vanderbilt University, Baylor College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and John Peter Smith Hospital.

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