Program to show how tai chi promotes wellness

October 16, 2014

 Paul-Lam---Tai-Chi-for-Health
Paul Lam
Image courtesy: Tai Chi for Health

Paul Lam, an international tai chi expert, will present “Tai Chi for Health and Wellness” from noon to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 20, on the UNT Health Science Center campus.

Dr. Lam is director of the Tai Chi for Health Institute in New South Wales, Australia. He is a licensed family physician and author of the books Overcoming Arthritis, Tai Chi for Beginners, Tai Chi for Diabetes and Teaching Tai Chi Effectively.

His presentation, a Special Grand Rounds sponsored by UNTHSC Professional and Continuing Education, is free to the public and also carries continuing medical education credit. The program will be in Room 124 of the Medical Education and Training Building, 1000 Montgomery St. in Fort Worth.

Dr. Lam’s visit is coordinated by Wayne English, DO, Adjunct Professor of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine. Dr. English teaches tai chi at 5:15 p.m. each Tuesday at the UNTHSC Fitness Center.

Tai chi originated as a Chinese martial art and has evolved into a meditative exercise and stress-reduction technique. Its series of exercises are slow and controlled. Principles are movement control, weight transference and integration of mind and body.

The Mayo Clinic describes tai chi as “low impact … generally safe for all ages and fitness levels.”

Tai chi is endorsed by the Arthritis Foundation.

Click here for more information on UNTHSC CME credit.

Bowling Pins Fc
UNTHSC history: Tavener bowling pins

By Alex Branch   For almost 50 years, UNT Health Science Center has preserved two scuffed bowling pins. The vintage pins recall a throwback to the 1950s and 60s, when people in vertically striped shirts and rented suede shoes flocked to bowling alleys on Friday nights. But these pin...Read more

Jun 18, 2018

DNA group with missing posters
A better cold-case database

By Jeff Carlton   A UNT Health Science Center team has upgraded and enhanced a national database for cold cases involving missing people and unidentified remains to offer more powerful investigative tools for criminal justice agencies and families searching for their loved ones. Called...Read more

Jun 13, 2018

Dr. Cunningham in the lab
Fighting a deadly side effect of heart failure

ByJan Jarvis   For many of the 6.5 million people who live with heart failure, developing water retention related to their disease will decrease their chances of survival. Although many patients with water retention are treated with diuretics, it is not known why they develop the condi...Read more

Jun 11, 2018

Cruz Ramos has prosthetic finger for baseball
Pitch-perfect prosthetics

By Alex Branch   An escalator accident severed Cruz Ramos’ index finger when he was a child, but that didn’t stop him from becoming a talented baseball player. He discovered in youth league that by adjusting his grip and putting spin on the ball, he could make most of the same thro...Read more

Jun 7, 2018