Paul Dorman establishes generous scholarship for Fort Worth’s first class of MDs


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Pharmaceutical executive, business investor and entrepreneur Paul Dorman has provided a generous gift to help make Fort Worth’s MD School a reality for this community – and a dream-come-true for future students.

The H. Paul Dorman Charter Scholarship Program will provide full first-year tuition to the inaugural class of MD students at the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine.  The 60 students, known as Dorman Scholars, will be the first to attend the new school, set to open in 2019 pending accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and approval from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Dorman is chairman and CEO of DFB Pharmaceuticals, a Fort Worth-based holding company that during the last 20 years has successfully invested, developed and operated multiple pharmaceutical businesses.  His entrepreneurial ventures have helped develop life-saving drugs, advance research and improve quality of life for patients.  He and his associates are currently actively involved in leading edge development of nanoparticles of chemotherapy drugs for improvement in the treatment of cancer and have four clinical trials in progress.

With this generous gift, Dorman will change the lives of 60 future physicians and the countless patients they will care for in the future.

A current Fort Worth resident, Dorman was born in Kilgore, Texas.  He attended high school in Mississippi and college in Louisiana. He holds a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from Tulane University and a Juris Doctor from Loyola University Law School. His gift was announced April 18 at the Leadership Outlook breakfast sponsored by Leadership Fort Worth.

“I understand the need for exceptionally trained physicians and I believe the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine team is creating the right formula to prepare students to practice medicine in the future,” Dorman said.  “This school will change the medical and economic landscape of our community and I can’t wait to meet the students who will make up the first class.”

The average student debt for a graduating physician is near $200,000, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.  Providing tuition support helps relieve some of this debt and allows students to pursue all areas of education without feeling they must focus on the highest paid specialties to address their debt.

“The importance of philanthropic support for our future medical students is profound and I am grateful and humbled by Mr. Dorman’s generous gift,” said Stuart D. Flynn, MD, founding dean of the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine.  “The value and meaning of this gift to our first class are immense.  This community continues to amaze and impress me with its generosity and strong support for this school of medicine and Mr. Dorman’s gift wonderfully exemplifies this.”

About the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine

The TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine is Fort Worth’s first M.D. school, set to open with a class of 60 students in July 2019, pending accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and approval from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. TCU and UNTHSC joined together in July 2015 to form this new allopathic medical school. The school of medicine’s focus on communication, a first-of-its-kind curriculum and the development of empathetic scholars uniquely positions the organization to radically transform medical education, improving care for future generations.

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