Online degree works for Amarillo public health director

By Sally Crocker

casie_stoughton
Casie Stoughton, RN, MPH

Caring for 250,000 people in addition to your own family can be a challenging job.

So when Casie Stoughton, RN, MPH, decided to pursue a public health graduate degree, she knew the best option would be through online study (SPH Master of Public Health Professional Option).

At the time, Stoughton was serving as Assistant Director for the City of Amarillo Department of Public Health. She has since been promoted to the Director position and credits her advanced degree from the UNTHSC School of Public Health as being important in helping her career move forward.

“One of my mentors is our former director, Matt Richardson, who received his MPH and DrPH degrees through the UNTHSC School of Public Health and is now the Denton County Health Director,” Stoughton said. “Matt is a big supporter of the school and encouraged me to take the next step. Being in Amarillo, I live a great distance away from schools of public health, so finding the online option was perfect for me.”

Stoughton manages a staff of 35 public health workers, with responsibility for TB clinics and immunizations, refugee health, public health preparedness, surveillance and prevention of communicable diseases, and epidemiology study/analysis related to patterns, causes and effects of local population health.

“Having a background of 10-plus years in public health really made the degree come alive for me,” she said. “I was able to apply my ‘boots on the ground’ field experiences toward the class work. Not only has it broadened my horizons, it also validates what we do each day in our jobs and why.”

Stoughton’s favorite part of the job is when she’s out in the community, working directly with local residents or solving a problem.

“Being able to ‘touch’ our clients personally is important. And of course, there are many meetings, and I also work closely with the media, as they are key to helping us get our messages to the community,” she said.

Stoughton said she “absolutely recommends” the UNTHSC School of Public Health and encourages her staff to pursue advanced degrees for further career development.

“We’ve been fortunate that the city allows me to budget for staff education, to help our people become even stronger in their roles as part of the team taking care of the health and welfare of our community,” she said.

 

Recent News

Dr. John Licciardone
  • Our People
|Nov 30, 2022

Key study results from HSC’s PRECISION Pain Research Registry published in JAMA Network Open

The Journal of the American Medical Association – Network Open has published findings from a recent HSC study about chronic lower back pain, race and the patient-physician relationship. The study revealed that Black patients reported worse outcomes for low back pain intensity and back-related d...
Ram flyer
  • Community
|Nov 23, 2022

Free pop-up medical, vision and dental clinic is just a week away

  The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth and Remote Area Medical – RAM® — a nonprofit provider of pop-up clinics that delivers free quality dental, vision and medical care to those in need — are bringing the free health care clinic to Dallas on Dec. 3 and 4....
Mathis, Borjas, Luna Smith Hsc Teaching Chair
  • Community
|Nov 18, 2022

HSC partners with Fort Worth ISD to honor outstanding science teacher 

The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth is committed to supporting science and health education for students at all levels of their academic journeys.  Since last year, HSC has sponsored Fort Worth Independent School District’s Chair for Teaching Excellence in Seconda...
Dr. Sid O'Bryant
  • Research
|Nov 14, 2022

Key study results from HSC’s Institute for Translational Research published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

Findings from a recent study by the team at the Institute for Translational Research led by Dr. Sid O’Bryant at The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth have been published by the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. The article, “Characterization of Mild Cognitive Impairme...