OMT treatment allows triathlon athlete to make the race

January 3, 2014

Jan Jowitt had trained for eight months for a Half Ironman triathlon when she injured her right shoulder.

The pain and limited range of motion made it hard for her to swim or even to sleep.

While  Jowitt, DHA, RN, Infection Control Officer at UNT Health Science Center, continued to train for the running and biking portions of the triathlon,  she feared she might need surgery and considered giving up her race plans. 

 "I couldn’t foresee myself completing the race with the pain I was experiencing," Dr. Jowitt said. "I understood the race itself was going to be the hardest challenge I have faced thus far, but with the shoulder pain, I began to feel discouraged."

That’s when she went to David Mason, DO, who practices osteopathic manipulative medicine at UNT Health’s Patient Care Center on the UNTHSC campus. 

Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) uses hands-on techniques to diagnose, treat, and prevent illness or injury.  An osteopathic physician employs stretching, gentle pressure and resistance to muscles and joints to heal the patient.

After a thorough examination, Dr. Mason found a strained muscle under Dr. Jowitt’s shoulder blade. He treated her with gentle OMT techniques, concentrating on her spine, ribs and upper extremities.

After three treatments, Dr. Jowitt experienced definite improvement.  Her range of motion returned almost to normal, and she was able to swim properly again. 

Dr. Jowitt participated in the Half Ironman triathlon on Sept. 7, 2013, completing 70.3 miles of running, swimming and biking. 

"If not for Dr. Mason, I truly would have been sidelined for the event of my life," she said. "I finished and received my medal in part because of him and his expert treatment."

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