MUSEUM CLASS TEACHES ART OF OBSERVATION

November 1, 2003

Weathered faces of drifters captured by photographer Richard Avedon. The John Singer Sargent portrait of heiress Alice Vanderbilt Shepard. These and other works of art are the centerpiece of a new partnership between UNT Health Science Center and the Amon Carter Museum.

Last March, the two Fort Worth institutions launched â??An Eye for Detail: The Art of Observation,â? a workshop where medical students developed their diagnostic skills by examining paintings and photographs from the museumâ??s collection. A second workshop was held in November.

The inaugural group of seven medical students participated in the free, six-hour extracurricular class, held on three Thursday evenings in March and April.

During each session, students looked closely at portraits in the galleries and shared their observations about the subject, including age, ethnicity, mood, occupation and other visual cues. Then they applied those same skills to medical photographs. A team of trained gallery teachers, a museum educator and medical school faculty facilitated the class.

â??Observation skills are absolutely critical for successful treatment but are hard to teach,â? said Bernard Rubin, DO, MPH, professor of internal medicine. â??Future physicians have to learn to trust their judgment and use technology or medical charts to supplement it, not replace it.â?

â??By looking closely at selected portraits in the museumâ??s collection, medical students can describe, share and back up what they see with visual clues,â? said Laura Matzer, public programs coordinator at the Amon Carter Museum. â??Our goal is that these future physicians will then apply those same critical observational skills in working with actual patients, and not go right for their charts.â?

The workshop is modeled after similar classes at Yale, Weill-Cornell, and the University of Texas at Houston.

Located across the street from each other, the health science center and the museum have long been neighbors in the museum district of Fort Worth.

The Carter opened in 1961 through the generosity of Amon G. Carter Sr. to house his collection of approximately 400 paintings and sculptures by Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell. The collection has since grown to almost 250,000 works of American art, including masterpieces in painting, sculpture, photography and works on paper by leading artists of the 19th and 20th centuries. The photography collection alone is one of the largest and most significant in the country.

###

Hsc Tcom Gold Humanism Society Inductees Fc
TCOM Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomes new inductees 

By Steven Bartolotta The humanistic side of medicine is alive and well at Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. The TCOM Chapter of the Arnold P Gold Foundation inducted 45 students and four faculty members into the Gold Humanism Honor Society on the campus of The University of North Texas H...Read more

Jun 15, 2021

John Licciardone Hsc Fort Worth Fc
eHealth interventions could help African-American patients in battle with chronic pain

By Steven Bartolotta The PRECISION Pain Research Registry at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth has identified important racial disparities in pain management that became more evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. Its study recently published in the special COVID...Read more

Jun 14, 2021

Diana Cervantes. Assistant Professor Biostatistics & Epidemiology
Dr. Diana Cervantes named among Fort Worth’s ‘most influential’ for public health service during the pandemic

By Sally Crocker Dr. Diana Cervantes has spent the last year keeping people informed and updated on all things coronavirus, and now she’s being recognized as one of Fort Worth Inc.’s “400 Most Influential People” for helping protect the community’s health during the pandemic. Dr....Read more

Jun 8, 2021

Opal Lee photo by Rodger Mallison/Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Commemorating Juneteenth

By Diane Smith-Pinckney On June 19 1865, Major General Gordan Granger marched into Galveston with a critical message: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”  This was the opening se...Read more

Jun 8, 2021