Healthier communities know no borders

December 2, 2015

Enrique Juarez Sanchez and Myrium Martinez-Banuelos

Enrique Juarez Sanchez, Hospital General de Mexico, and Myriam Martinez-Banuelos, Lewis Library

By Cari Hyden

Myriam Martinez-Banuelos discovered a way to create healthier communities both in Texas and in Mexico – simultaneously.

As a result, many librarians in Mexico now are aware of Spanish-language health information resources provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). And Martinez-Banuelos has better insights into the Hispanic culture, an underrepresented group she is trying to reach through her efforts in North Texas.

Martinez-Banuelos, Outreach Librarian for the Lewis Library, created the “Crossing Borders” program to promote collaboration between health sciences librarians in the United States and Mexico.

Through the program, Martinez-Banuelos visited libraries at some of the National Institutes of Health in Mexico City in 2014, and Enrique Juarez Sanchez, Coordinator of Information Services for the medical library at the Hospital General de Mexico, visited several U.S. libraries – including Lewis Library – in October.

Sanchez said that the medical library systems in Mexico don’t emphasize offering outreach programs that provide sound health information to patients and their families – and librarians must search online when patients approach them with questions.

“I am amazed at the resources here in the U.S.,” Sanchez said.  “Opportunities in Mexico are limited. The political, economic and social environments are challenging.”

He was delighted to learn about different library systems and the National Library of Medicine resources that he can share with patients and their families at his 1,000-bed hospital, the largest public hospital in Latin America.

Sanchez also attended the Medical Library Association South Central Chapter Annual Meeting in Little Rock, Ark., where he had an opportunity to meet fellow librarians from Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas to share best practices in medical libraries.

He found the experience well worth his time.

“I love to work with people, and I love that I can help them,” he said. “We don’t have community outreach programs in Mexico, but we have great opportunity. I’m looking forward to implementing the programs I have learned about, but tailored to our community.”

While Martinez-Banuelos was visiting libraries at the National Institutes of Health in Mexico, she found an eager audience for the NLM’s health information resources available in Spanish for patients. She also attended a conference for medical librarians in Mexico organized by the library at the School of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico to learn about the health care system in Mexico and information services for patients.

“The Crossing Borders Project raised the visibility of the National Library of Medicine’s resources,” she said, “and it will help Lewis Library meet the needs of the Hispanic community in our 24-county region.”

The cultural and professional exchange program is the first international project funded by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region. Lewis Library coordinates a program with the National Library of Medicine to provide outreach services in 24 Texas counties.

Hsc Tcom Gold Humanism Society Inductees Fc
TCOM Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomes new inductees 

By Steven Bartolotta The humanistic side of medicine is alive and well at Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. The TCOM Chapter of the Arnold P Gold Foundation inducted 45 students and four faculty members into the Gold Humanism Honor Society on the campus of The University of North Texas H...Read more

Jun 15, 2021

John Licciardone Hsc Fort Worth Fc
eHealth interventions could help African-American patients in battle with chronic pain

By Steven Bartolotta The PRECISION Pain Research Registry at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth has identified important racial disparities in pain management that became more evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. Its study recently published in the special COVID...Read more

Jun 14, 2021

Diana Cervantes. Assistant Professor Biostatistics & Epidemiology
Dr. Diana Cervantes named among Fort Worth’s ‘most influential’ for public health service during the pandemic

By Sally Crocker Dr. Diana Cervantes has spent the last year keeping people informed and updated on all things coronavirus, and now she’s being recognized as one of Fort Worth Inc.’s “400 Most Influential People” for helping protect the community’s health during the pandemic. Dr....Read more

Jun 8, 2021

Opal Lee photo by Rodger Mallison/Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Commemorating Juneteenth

By Diane Smith-Pinckney On June 19 1865, Major General Gordan Granger marched into Galveston with a critical message: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”  This was the opening se...Read more

Jun 8, 2021