HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER SEEKS PARTICIPANTS FOR EPILEPSY STUDY

January 28, 2000

FORT WORTH – Texas â?? A new medication is being studied at the UNT Health Science Center in the search for a more effective antiepileptic drug without as many side effects. Researchers are seeking additional medications so patients will have more options to choose from in their therapy.

The health science center is seeking males and females over the age of 12 with incompletely controlled epilepsy on at least one antiepileptic drug already. According to Dr. William McIntosh, chief of neurology at the UNT Health Science Center and the primary investigator in the study, the health science center is one of 80 sites in the United States and Canada seeking a total of 400 patients to enroll in the study. The health science center will seek participants to monitor on the new medication throughout the year.

Researchers hope the use of this study medication will prevent the number of seizures in patients. Most of these antiepileptic medications are not effective until they reach a certain level in the body, and that level has to be maintained. The goal is to keep the blood level high enough to prevent seizures, but not so high that it causes excessive sleepiness or other unpleasant side effects.

Previously over a dozen drugs, the oldest dating back to 1912, have been available for those with epilepsy. The most commonly prescribed drug still used today was developed in the 1950s.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, nearly 1.4 million Americans have epilepsy, with the majority of these Americans under age 45. Epilepsy is a neurological condition that from time to time produces brief disturbances in the normal electrical functions of the brain. Normal brain function is made possible by millions of tiny electrical charges passing between nerve cells in the brain and to all parts of the body. When someone has epilepsy, this normal pattern may be interrupted by irregular bursts of electrical energy (called epileptic seizures) that are much more intense than usual. They may affect a person’s consciousness, bodily movements or sensations for a short time.

In about seven out of ten people with epilepsy, no cause can be found. Among the rest, the cause may be any one of a number of things that can make a difference in the way the brain works, including head injuries, brain tumors, genetic conditions, problems in development of the brain before birth, and infections like meningitis or encephalitis.

All study-related medication, tests and exams will be provided free of charge. In many cases, volunteers are compensated for their time and travel expenses. Those interested can discuss clinical research participation with their doctor and call the Office of Clinical Trials at (817) 735-0256.

Vic Holmes, Mpas, Edd, Pa C Assistant Professor
HSC Pride: Increased pronoun use is an emerging trend among health professionals

By Diane Smith-Pinckney The embroidery on Vic Holmes’ black scrubs identify him as a physician assistant and an ally to LGBTQ+ patients. The words, stitched under a rainbow-colored Caduceus pin and near his heart, read: “Vic Holmes, PA-C, He/Him/His, Family Medicine.” Pronouns are...Read more

Jun 21, 2021

Hsc Katie Pelch
Public health scientist lends expertise to national database addressing safer use of chemicals in our environment

By Sally Crocker Katie Pelch, PhD, wants you to know what’s in our environment and how the chemicals we’re exposed to every day may affect our health. Dr. Pelch is a part-time Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, in the HSC School of Public Health (SPH), where...Read more

Jun 21, 2021

Hsc Tcom Gold Humanism Society Inductees Fc
TCOM Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society welcomes new inductees 

By Steven Bartolotta The humanistic side of medicine is alive and well at Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. The TCOM Chapter of the Arnold P Gold Foundation inducted 45 students and four faculty members into the Gold Humanism Honor Society on the campus of The University of North Texas H...Read more

Jun 15, 2021

John Licciardone Hsc Fort Worth Fc
eHealth interventions could help African-American patients in battle with chronic pain

By Steven Bartolotta The PRECISION Pain Research Registry at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth has identified important racial disparities in pain management that became more evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. Its study recently published in the special COVID...Read more

Jun 14, 2021