Goldman scholarship ‘means the world’ to driven student

September 20, 2017

By Jan Jarvis

Goldman Scholar
 
Sarah Edwards has always ridden her bicycle everywhere – to high school classes and later college, to part-time jobs and everywhere else.

She has no driver’s license and few options.

“We’ve never really had a car,” Edwards said. “But that didn’t stop me because I’ve always been very self-driven.”

That ambition and drive is paying off. Edwards is the first recipient of the Carol and Ronnie Goldman Scholarship. She recently began her first year in the UNT System College of Pharmacy.

Edwards said she is so grateful for the scholarship and the opportunities it provides. Coming from a low-income family, Edwards said she has always had to delegate how much time she could spend studying instead of working.

The four-year scholarship not only reduces the financial burden of pharmacy school, but also opens the door to participating in student organizations, doing unpaid internships or conducting research.

“This scholarship means the world to me,” she said. “When I found out, I was so excited I practically jumped off my chair and called my mom, all in about 30 seconds.”

Ronnie and Carol Goldman said they could not be more pleased with the first student who was selected by the school to receive the scholarship.

“Rather than make a gift to the school, we wanted to help a student that would not be able to afford their education,” he said. “We are very impressed with the person they chose.”

The Goldmans said that for years they drove by UNTHSC without knowing much about what happened at the school. When they finally went on a tour and saw for themselves the research and education being conducted on campus, they wanted to be a part of it.

“We are amazed and proud to have this school in our city,” Mr. Goldman said.

After her parents divorced a decade ago, Edwards helped raise her three younger siblings. Although her family could not provide financial support, they always encouraged her to pursue her dreams of a career in health care.

“My mother never made us feel like we were poor,” she said. “She made up for it with a plethora of love.”

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