A global audience for TCOM’s rural medicine program


Share this story:

By Jan Jarvis


 
An international delegation of visitors from 12 countries came to Texas with one common goal: to learn more about how to prevent, treat and manage health problems affecting women around the globe.

They found what they were looking for at UNT Health Science Center, one of six stops that the group made as part of a coast-to-coast tour of clinics, government agencies and medical schools.

The UNTHSC stop was chosen for its Rural Scholars Program and its focus on training students to treat health issues affecting females in Texas, according to the State Department, which is sponsoring the International Visitor Leadership Program’s multi-regional project “Global Women’s Health Issues.”

The World Learning Visitor Exchange Program, a non-profit organization that focuses on international development and education, organized the event to increase information sharing and examine public awareness campaigns about health issues.

The group, which included a nurse from the Marshall Islands, a physician from Saudi Arabia and a public health specialist from Malaysia, were eager to learn how the United States addresses medical issues. They found that physicians in rural Texas face many of the same challenges they do in their home countries: a shortage of physicians, lack of high tech equipment, isolation and economic challenges.

But through the Rural Osteopathic Medical Education of Texas program, known as ROME, family medicine physicians are working to meet the needs of people in these communities, said John Gibson, MD, Assistant Dean Office of Rural Medicine Education. UNTHSC’s Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine graduates more primary care physicians than any other program in the state.

“Family medicine fills a great gap in health care coverage,” he said.

Primary care physicians play an increasingly important role in healthcare, said Elaine Head, PhD, President and CEO of Global North Texas, which coordinated the visit.

“The family doctor seems to do all, from birth to the end of life,” she said. “Every community needs them.”

After learning about the ROME program and taking a tour, the delegation left for San Francisco with ideas that they hoped would benefit patients in their home countries.

“What I see here in Fort Worth is really inspiring,” said Dina Sajdeya, a physician who is part of the international delegation.

Share this story:

Zoonotic Disease Fair to cover important topics for Texas

By Sally Crocker   UNTHSC students, faculty and staff are invited to the 2nd Annual Zoonotic Disease Fair from noon to 3 p.m. on Nov. 21 to learn about some of the common diseases found in Texas that can be passed from animals to humans. “It pays to be aware,” said public health st...Read more

Nov 16, 2017

A champion of the underdog

By Alex Branch   Amy Raines Milenkov, MPH, DrPH, has always cared about the underdog. She cared about the low-income women and children afflicted with HIV or AIDS who she helped as a social worker in the 1990s, when life-saving drug cocktails were only emerging. She cared for the vu...Read more

Nov 13, 2017

Using teamwork to train better healthcare leaders

By Jan Jarvis Catherine Daniel, a first-year student in the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, clicked on the keys of her laptop, searching for data about a program to address infant mortality in Tarrant County. “There needs to be a better way of identifying high risk people,” she ...Read more

Nov 13, 2017

Palladino Family

Student vets proud to see UNTHSC designated a Purple Heart University

By Alex Branch Gary and Aundrea Palladino met while serving in the U.S. Air Force as pharmacy technicians at Joint Base Andrews in Washington, D.C. At the three pharmacies on base, Gary and Aundrea filled prescriptions and managed inventory, compounded IV and topical medication orders, and...Read more

Nov 9, 2017