A forum for sharing aging research


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By Jan Jarvis

Dr Forster
 
Research into how the normal and pathological brain ages will be presented by graduate fellows on May 10 during the 16th annual Neurobiology of Aging Trainee Symposium.

Neurobiology of Aging Trainee Symposium

Date: May 10, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m.
Location: CBH 220 Alcon Auditorium

The symposium begins at 8:30 a.m. in the CBH 220 Alcon Auditorium.

The symposium is an integral part of each fellows training, serving as a forum for sharing their research accomplishments with UNT Health Science Center and the local community, said Michael Forster, PhD, Regents Professor and Executive Director, Institute for Healthy Aging. It also provides them the opportunity to interact with a keynote speaker representing an outstanding extramural scientist working in the neurobiology aging field.

This year’s keynote speaker, Marc Diamond, MD, will present “Tau Prions: Insights into Initiation and Diversity of Neurodegeneration Syndromes” at noon. Dr. Diamond, Professor of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, is the founding director of the Center for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases, a multidisciplinary team created in 2014 to find therapies to cure or halt the progression of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Dr. Diamond’s research focuses on molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders with the goal of developing novel therapies and diagnostic tools. A therapeutic antibody he co-developed at Washington University in St. Louis is now entering clinical trials for treatment of dementia.

“The specific goal of the Neurobiology of Aging training program is to provide students with specialized interdisciplinary guidance, support, and training that will allow them to become leaders in developing basic and translational research programs addressing normal aging processes in the nervous system and how they lead to debilitating neurodegenerative diseases,” Dr. Forster said.

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