DNA Lab in news around the country

April 1, 2009

The UNT Center for Human Identification’s DNA lab at the UNT Health Science Center, has been in the news for its role in identifying missing persons and found remains from across the country.

The lab positively identified the remains of Leslie Adams in Georgia, according to news outlets wsbtv.com, Online Athens, Macon.com, Ledger-Enquirer.com, examiner.com and the Fort Mill Times Online. Adams, first reported missing in 2005, was from Atlanta, Ga., and her remains were found in 2007.

The Detroit News reported that the lab was working to either confirm or rule out the remains of a woman found in 1982 are those of a 15-year-old runaway who disappeared at around the same time. DNA samples from the family of the runaway are being compared to the remains.

In Owesnboro, Ky., the Messenger-Inquirer included an article about the attempt to identify three bodies found in a van at the bottom of a lake. Authorities believe they know the identities but have sent DNA samples from all three bodies, as well as from the families of the three men they suspect were last alive before the van sunk to the bottom of the lake.

A Snohomish County, Wash., Jane Doe’s DNA was submitted to the lab in hopes of identifying her . Authorities know how she died – her murderer has served 30 years behind bars. They just do not know who she is. Her story appeared in the Edmonds Enterprise, the Lynnwood/Mountlake Terrace Enterprise and on HeraldNet.

KVII, ProNews 7, in Amarillo, reported the DNA lab helped identify a Davenport, Iowa, woman whose remains were found in 1983 in Amarillo. Police know that the woman was murdered, but the case has now been reopened to try to find her killer.

The lab is attempting to identify a body found in the Mississippi River near Little Rock, Ark. Authorities believe she is a woman reported as missing from Tiptonville, Tenn., in 1982. The story was reported in the Lake County Banner.

A possible victim of a serial killer may also be identified by the DNA lab. She was found in 1950, and two families who think she may be their mother recently contact authorities about her, according to the Charleston (W.V.) Gazette.  Her DNA as well as samples from each of the families are being analyzed in the lab.

Produce
HSC’s FitWorth providing dairy, produce for Fort Worth’s food insecure families

By Diane Smith The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth’s FitWorth program is partnering with GoFresh to provide boxes of food to hungry families struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic. The collaboration will supply families with dairy and produce through the Un...Read more

Jul 8, 2020

Dr Arthur Eisenberg Fc
50 Heroes: Dr. Arthur Eisenberg

So many families with missing loved ones received closure thanks to Arthur “Art” Eisenberg. A pioneer in bringing DNA typing into both paternity testing and the field of forensic genetics, Dr. Eisenberg helped establish the UNT Center for Human Identification as well as The University of Nort...Read more

Jul 6, 2020

July 4th Covid 19 Fc
Navigating through July 4th and the summer of COVID-19

By Sally Crocker In light of new state guidelines issued last week, HSC public health expert Diana Cervantes offers some tips on how to conduct July 4th gatherings and other summertime activities with friends and family. The advice comes after the Texas Governor’s Office closed bars and ...Read more

Jun 30, 2020

Food Insecurity Donations Fc
Food insecurity concerns heighten for many as COVID-19 again surges

By Sally Crocker New HSC faculty member Charlotte Noble, PhD, MPH, and her family moved from Florida to Fort Worth in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, when little was yet known about the reach of the virus, its outcomes and how long it would last. Months later, as states like Texas...Read more

Jun 29, 2020