Carl Everett’s planned gift will create endowed professorship


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TCOM Students Family Medicine

Carl E. Everett, DO, spent half of his life supporting the UNT Health Science Center.

As co-founder of the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Dr. Everett tirelessly penned solicitation letters, hosted country club lunches and launched a “One Thousand Club” of donors to raise money for the institution that opened in 1970.

Later, he offered TCOM students on their geriatric rotations real-world experiences in the successful nursing homes he operated.

Carl E. Everett
Carl E. Everett, DO

And before his death at age 97 in 2012, Dr. Everett ensured through a planned gift that his legacy of support for the school would continue forever. Dr. Everett dedicated one-third of his residual estate to the UNTHSC Foundation, which will use the gift to establish an endowed professorship in Family Medicine.

“My father was a humble man who didn’t talk about his own accomplishments, but we knew he was very proud to have had a role in the creation of TCOM,” said his son, Richard Everett of Houston. “When he realized he had the opportunity to leave some money to continue his support for the institution, it made him very happy.”

UNTHSC honored Dr. Everett in 2011 by naming the Education and Administration Building after him. In 2009, he was awarded a “Doctor of Philanthropy” honorary degree, signifying the institution’s highest level of philanthropic support.

“We have named a building after Dr. Everett, but this endowment is perhaps even more durable than bricks and mortar,” said Don Peska, DO, Dean of TCOM. “This gift means that his vision for osteopathic medicine in our community will endure through our fifth decade and beyond.”

Endowed professorships allow UNTHSC to recruit and retain the best and brightest faculty. The Family Medicine professorship also will solidify one of TCOM’s core strengths of educating physicians to provide the highest-quality primary care in North Texas and across the United States.

“My father was a general practitioner who believed in having a personal relationship with patients,” Richard Everett said. “He would be delighted to know that his gift will help train future generations of physicians to fill that role.”

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