‘Big concepts’ in cancer treatment

January 11, 2016

SHIFT 2016

Rhett Butler and Erica Onwuegbuchu

By Alex Branch

When students in the Master of Science program in Medical Sciences sat down to plan a community service project, they weren’t interested in anything routine.

“We wanted to make an impact,” student Rhett Butler said. “We wanted to do something that has never been done at UNT Health Science Center.”

Butler, Erica Onwuegbuchu, Victoria Chu and other class members will achieve that at 6 p.m. on Jan. 19 when several cancer experts from across the U.S. converge at UNTHSC for SHIFT 2016, a symposium organized by students and focused on exploring new paradigms in the development of cancer therapies.

The free event brings future medical professionals together with the community they will serve to explore local solutions to major issues in healthcare, Butler said. Local cancer advocacy groups, students and the public are invited.

“We’re excited to invite the North Texas cancer advocacy community onto our campus and introduce them to some really big concepts,” Butler said.

Presentations

  • Eugenie Kleinerman, MD, MD Anderson Cancer Center, on the financial and regulatory obstacles to novel drug development
  • Colin Correnti, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, on the revolutionary therapy “tumor paint,” an experimental substance derived from scorpion venom
  • Christopher Jordan, DO, UNT Health Science Center, on the economics of treating cancer in Tarrant County.

“I applaud the initiative that Rhett and his fellow students in the Medical Science program have demonstrated,” said Meharvan Singh, PhD, Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. “Such passion and commitment is inspiring and a testimony to their genuine interest in serving the public.”

The Master of Science Degree in Medical Sciences program is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their credentials for admittance into medical school.

Diana Cervantes. Assistant Professor Biostatistics & Epidemiology
Dr. Diana Cervantes named among Fort Worth’s ‘most influential’ for public health service during the pandemic

By Sally Crocker Dr. Diana Cervantes has spent the last year keeping people informed and updated on all things coronavirus, and now she’s being recognized as one of Fort Worth Inc.’s “400 Most Influential People” for helping protect the community’s health during the pandemic. Dr....Read more

Jun 8, 2021

Opal Lee photo by Rodger Mallison/Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Celebrating Juneteenth

By Diane Smith-Pinckney On June 19 1865, Major General Gordan Granger marched into Galveston with a critical message: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”  This was the opening se...Read more

Jun 8, 2021

Dr. Scott Walters
The realities of ‘breaking bad’ and how one HSC researcher is attacking the opioid crisis

By Sally Crocker He didn’t know it at the time, but when Dr. Scott Walters was growing up in San Diego in the mid 1980s, a next-door neighbor was concealing a homemade meth lab just across the fence and mere steps away from his bedroom window. For quite some time, concerned parents in his fa...Read more

Jun 8, 2021

MET Building at UNTHSC
HSC Health Diabetes Education Service Merits ADA Recognition

The prestigious American Diabetes Association (ADA) Education Recognition Certificate for a quality diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) service was recently awarded to the HSC Health Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Program. ADA believes that this service offers high...Read more

Jun 8, 2021