A wider window for treating stroke

July 8, 2015

Shaohua-Yang,-stroke-research

When someone has a stroke, there’s a very narrow window – three hours or less –when the drug tPA can be used to dissolve blood clots and restore blood flow.

But few people benefit from this treatment because they don’t get care fast enough, said Shaohua Yang, PhD, MD, Professor of Pharmacology and Neuroscience.

By widening this window, it may be possible to prevent the long-term consequences of a stroke.

“Damage to the brain from a stroke can trigger long-term memory loss and dementia downstream,” he said.

A $103,000 grant from the American Heart Association is not only helping Dr. Yang better understand how to prevent the consequences of stroke, it also is raising UNT Health Science Center’s profile as a leader in stroke research.

Despite the highly competitive environment that exists in grant funding, stroke research has expanded at UNTHSC. Over the last two years, the American Heart Association has awarded four grants to young scientists in Pharmacology and Neuroscience.

Over the last decade, research has led to improvements in the survival rate for stroke patients. Once the second-leading cause of death in the United States, stroke now ranks fifth. But there’s been little improvement in long-term outcomes.

“We can treat the acute stroke, but the long-term consequences are much more severe, and we don’t have much to offer patients,” Dr. Yang said.

More than 800,000 patients suffer a stroke annually. Between 25 percent and 30 percent of stroke survivors develop dementia, often within the first year of recovery. Having a stroke doubles the risk of developing dementia.

Expanding the treatment window might be one way to prevent or slow dementia and improve the quality of life for patients, Dr. Yang said.

The pattersons
The ATV accident that changed my life

By Rita Patterson, Department of Family Medicine I was attending an event at work when I learned that my husband, Les, had crashed his all-terrain vehicle near our Weatherford home. The ATV rolled onto his leg, crushing it. He hollered for help until a neighbor heard him and called 911. The...Read more

Jun 20, 2018

Charles and Teresa Gonzales
A population at risk

By Jan Jarvis   Charles and Teresa Gonzales know what dementia does to a person. The Grand Prairie couple has lived through it with both of their mothers. “The first thing I noticed was my mother kept asking the same question over and over,” Charles said. “She’d ask somethin...Read more

Jun 19, 2018

Bowling Pins Fc
UNTHSC history: Tavener bowling pins

By Alex Branch   For almost 50 years, UNT Health Science Center has preserved two scuffed bowling pins. The vintage pins recall a throwback to the 1950s and 60s, when people in vertically striped shirts and rented suede shoes flocked to bowling alleys on Friday nights. But these pin...Read more

Jun 18, 2018

DNA group with missing posters
A better cold-case database

By Jeff Carlton   A UNT Health Science Center team has upgraded and enhanced a national database for cold cases involving missing people and unidentified remains to offer more powerful investigative tools for criminal justice agencies and families searching for their loved ones. Called...Read more

Jun 13, 2018