Academic Seminars

Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids (EETs) and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase (sEH):A Journey from Physiology to Clinical Trials: GSBS Guest Speaker Dr. John Imig (December 4, 2019)
November 29, 2019
 

Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids (EETs) and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase (sEH):A Journey from Physiology to Clinical Trials: GSBS Guest Speaker Dr. John Imig (December 4, 2019)

Seminar Location: IREB-230 beginning at 10:00 am

John D. Imig is an accomplished scientist focused on cardiovascular and kidney diseases. He received his BA in Biology from Blackburn College and a PhD in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Louisville. John has been a faculty member at the Tulane University School of Medicine and the Medical College of Georgia before joining the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2008. Dr. Imig has demonstrated that a research laboratory can make significant basic science breakthroughs while also developing promising new drugs.

Throughout his career, Dr. Imig has emphasized scholarship through the publication of approximately 225 articles, original papers, editorials and reviews, and has presented approximately 90 national and international lectures and workshops. He holds four patents and has a number of other pending patent applications. John has successfully worked with biotechnology companies through research and licensing agreements to move drugs forward into clinical trials. Dr. Imig has received a number of distinguished awards including the Established Investigator Award and Lewis K. Dahl Memorial Lectureship from the American Heart Association and being named a Medical College of Wisconsin Eminent Scholar. John is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health, Wisconsin Economic Development Commission, and the Dr. Ralph and Marian Falk Medical Research Trust.

The Imig laboratory is dedicated to understanding how certain fatty acids, known as eicosanoids, influence kidney and cardiovascular function. His team has advanced its findings through translational research and developed new eicosanoid-based drugs to potentially treat diseases including hypertension, stroke, heart attacks, diabetes, and kidney diseases.