Join the monthly Sustainability Challenge for a chance to win a reusable cutlery set!

 

September’s Sustainability Challenge is a partner challenge! Based on feedback from previous challenges, this month you’ll get to go through the challenge with another person or two. For 3 weeks in September, we’ll send you an email with what you and your partner(s) will focus on for the week. You’ll help keep each other accountable and talk about what you’re doing. You can choose your own partner or we’ll match you up with someone. Participants will be entered into a drawing for a reusable cutlery set (at least 6 sets will be given away and can be mailed if needed). Click on the link to register.

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Johnson, Pharmacology & Neuroscience

 

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Johnson, for receiving an award from the University of Southern California, in the amount of $570,000, for the study entitled “The A3 Study: Ante-Amyloid prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.”

For more details, please view the latest Monthly Research Report on our site, linked above.

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Johnson, Pharmacology & Neuroscience

 

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Johnson, for receiving an award from the University of Southern California, in the amount of $570,000, for the study entitled “The A-45 Study: Combination anti-amyloid therapy for preclinical Alzheimer’s disease.”

For more details, please view the latest Monthly Research Report on our site, linked above.

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Johnson, Pharmacology & Neuroscience

 

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Johnson, for receiving an award from the University of Southern California, in the amount of $1,591,544, for the study entitled “AHEAD 3-45 Study: A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Parallel Treatment Arm, 216 Week Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Treatment With BAN2401 in Subjects With Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease and Elevated Amyloid (A45 Trial) and in Subjects.”

For more details, please view the latest Monthly Research Report on our site, linked above.

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month – North Texas Eye Research Institute

 

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month – North Texas Eye Research Institute

As children grow, their eyes change quickly. Careful attention to a child’s eye health can help catch problems early, while their eyes are still developing.

– During a baby’s first months, their central vision is still developing. A newborn baby can see, but they are still forming connections between their retina and their brain. As central vision develops, watch for baby focusing on objects dangled right in front of them.

– By age 3 months, a baby’s eyes should focus and follow objects. In the first two months of life, an infant’s eyes may appear to cross or wander out to the sides. This is usually normal. As visual coordination improves, the baby’s eyes will work together to focus and follow a moving object. If you do not notice this happening consistently by age 3 months, talk with your pediatrician.

– Watch for misalignment in toddlers, or one eye that looks straight ahead while the other eye turns inward, outward, upward, or downward.

– Keep toddlers away from cleaning products. Young children are more likely than working-age adults to get eye damage from chemical burns.

– Many school-age children are naturally farsighted. In most cases, they do not need glasses. Children generally can accommodate by using their focusing muscles to see clearly near and far. Significant farsightedness can lead to strabismus and amblyopia (“lazy eye”) if left uncorrected.

– Good screen time hygiene may help lower the risk of myopia and digital eye strain. Encourage your child to follow the 20-20-20 rule: Look up from the screen every 20 minutes and focus at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

– Three not-so-obvious signs of childhood vision problems are: 1) quick loss of interest in activities that require extensive eye use, 2) losing your place when reading and 3) turning the head to look at something in front of you. If you observe one or more of these symptoms in your child, schedule an eye exam.

– For teens and young adults, eye injuries are the most common cause of blindness. Regular eye glasses and sunglasses do not offer sufficient protection from sports-related eye injuries. In fact, they can shatter on impact, causing even more damage to the eyes.

– More than 90 percent of children’s eye injuries can be prevented with protective goggles. Children should wear sports eye protectors made with polycarbonate lenses for all sports and activities with a risk of eye injury.

Good vision is key to a child’s physical development, success in school, and overall well-being. Don’t skip regular vision screenings. These are important for detecting and correcting eye problems early.

Source: https://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/tips-children-eyes-vision
For additional information: https://www.aao.org/

Master the Art of Public Speaking via Toastmasters – Virtual

 

Does speaking up in meetings give you anxiety? Does the thought of presenting to your class cause you to run for cover? Then now is the perfect time to take control of your anxiety, and check out the HSC’s Toastmasters Club!

Join us every Tuesday from 12:05 – 12:55 PM, and check out how we can help you overcome your fear of public speaking. For the next few months we will continue to meet virtually via Zoom. – https://unthsc.zoom.us/j/8177352327

Check out HSC’s Toastmaster website to learn more: https://2992028.toastmastersclubs.org

Culturally Aware Mentoring

 

Culturally Aware Mentoring: MyMentor

Mentoring is an important aspect to education, particularly in the STEM and research fields. Although things are different this year, the need for mentoring has not changed. The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) offers a solution: culturally aware guided virtual mentoring, also known as MyMentor. This mentoring is available within NRMN’s virtual community, MyNRMN.

Thus, this semester, take a new approach to mentoring: the MyMentor focus is on culturally aware mentoring and helping individuals grow personally and professionally.

Whether you’re a mentor or a mentee, if you’re hesitant to start a new mentoring connection because you don’t know what to expect, there’s no need to worry. Mentees select their preferred Path (Undergraduate, Post Baccalaureate, Graduate, Post Doc, or Jr. Faculty) and the both the mentor and mentee are provided discussion prompts to guide them through topics, both personal and professional. The philosophy behind MyMentor is to develop a person’s confidence and sense of identity in order to help them move forward in whatever trajectory they choose. The prompts are intended to help both the mentee and mentor open up so that they can each grow throughout the duration of the connection.

Most connections take approximately 30 minutes per week over the span of 4-5 months, but this is all flexible depending upon the needs of each individual connection. Additionally, each discussion prompt is customizable so that a mentoring connection can specify exactly what they’re hoping to achieve. Mentors and mentees also have the option to create their own discussion prompts and goals to facilitate their needs.

If you’re still feeling trepidatious about starting a mentoring connection, please reach out and let us know. We would be happy to provide additional insight or even show you the ins and outs of a connection. The most important thing right now is to stay connected, and we’re here to help in any way we can.

To access MyMentor: https://my.nrmnet.net/program/p/mymentor

For any questions: info@nrmnet.net or katie.stinson@unthsc.edu

Culturally Aware Mentoring

 

Culturally Aware Mentoring: MyMentor

Mentoring is an important aspect to education, particularly in the STEM and research fields. Although things are different this year, the need for mentoring has not changed. The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) offers a solution: culturally aware guided virtual mentoring, also known as MyMentor. This mentoring is available within NRMN’s virtual community, MyNRMN.

Thus, this semester, take a new approach to mentoring: the MyMentor focus is on culturally aware mentoring and helping individuals grow personally and professionally.

Whether you’re a mentor or a mentee, if you’re hesitant to start a new mentoring connection because you don’t know what to expect, there’s no need to worry. Mentees select their preferred Path (Undergraduate, Post Baccalaureate, Graduate, Post Doc, or Jr. Faculty) and the both the mentor and mentee are provided discussion prompts to guide them through topics, both personal and professional. The philosophy behind MyMentor is to develop a person’s confidence and sense of identity in order to help them move forward in whatever trajectory they choose. The prompts are intended to help both the mentee and mentor open up so that they can each grow throughout the duration of the connection.

Most connections take approximately 30 minutes per week over the span of 4-5 months, but this is all flexible depending upon the needs of each individual connection. Additionally, each discussion prompt is customizable so that a mentoring connection can specify exactly what they’re hoping to achieve. Mentors and mentees also have the option to create their own discussion prompts and goals to facilitate their needs.

If you’re still feeling trepidatious about starting a mentoring connection, please reach out and let us know. We would be happy to provide additional insight or even show you the ins and outs of a connection. The most important thing right now is to stay connected, and we’re here to help in any way we can.

To access MyMentor: https://my.nrmnet.net/program/p/mymentor

For any questions: info@nrmnet.net or katie.stinson@unthsc.edu