School of Public Health

Editorial questions measurement frequently used in population health studies

By Sally Crocker In a new American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) editorial, a UNT Health Science Center professor challenges a conventional research formula for measuring the health of populations, calling the method age discriminatory. M. Harvey Brenner, PhD, Professor of Health Behavior and Health Systems at the UNT Health Science Center School of Public... Read more »

Sep 22, 2017

A passion for public health

By Sally Crocker The School of Public Health was in its infancy when Lilly Ramphal-Naley, MD, MPH, joined as adjunct faculty in 2000. The school had been officially founded just one year before at UNT Health Science Center. Accreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health was still a year away. But since those... Read more »

Sep 14, 2017

Better outcomes for underserved patients

By Sally Crocker   A team of graduates from UNT Health Science Center’s School of Public Health (SPH) is working toward improved patient outcomes in treatment and prevention of cancer, diabetes, maternal/child health and infectious diseases such as HIV and Hepatitis C. Rohit Ojha, DrPH (SPH ’10), was recruited last year to establish and lead... Read more »

Sep 12, 2017

Hurricane Harvey increases public health threat from mosquitoes

By Alex Branch   Floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey are expected to remain in southeast Texas for some time. Among the public health concerns is how stagnant water could impact the mosquito population and potential transmission of associated diseases. UNT Health Science Center’s medical entomologist Joon Lee, PhD, Associate Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the... Read more »

Aug 31, 2017

Vets and pets play key role during disaster response

By Alex Branch   Among the many lessons from Hurricane Katrina was that the bond between humans and animals cannot be ignored during disaster response. With no plan by emergency responders to account for household pets during rescues 12 years ago, many families refused to board helicopters, boats or buses without their beloved household pets.... Read more »

Aug 29, 2017

Professor named Public Health Veterinarian of the Year

By Sally Crocker   For years, UNT Health Science Center’s Katherine Fogelberg, DVM, PhD, has donated her spare time to treating animals and finding homes for rescued pets. An Assistant Professor in the School of Public Health, Dr. Fogelberg has worked with zoo and wildlife animals as far away as South Africa, and has helped... Read more »

Aug 11, 2017

A better tool to fight substance abuse

By Sally Crocker   A new article in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment suggests that a computer program called MAPIT, developed by a UNT Health Science Center researcher, is more effective than standard justice system remedies in prompting substance-using probationers and parolees to start their treatment plans. “Health and justice systems are overburdened in... Read more »

Aug 3, 2017

A new look at triple-negative breast cancer

By Jan Jarvis   Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is often aggressive, hard to treat and disproportionately affects carriers of the BRCA1 gene mutation and younger women of African origin. Researchers at UNT Health Science Center have received a $1.9 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to help develop a new therapy that holds promise... Read more »

Jul 19, 2017

Recognizing the value of a welcoming environment

By Sally Crocker   Alita Andrews, a 2016 School of Public Health MPH graduate, is a Health Advocate for the UNT Health Science Center TESSA program that serves Tarrant County victims of interpersonal violence. In the beginning, she met clients in a traditional office setting, with a desk facing the door and two chairs in... Read more »

Jul 12, 2017

New CDC article weighs importance of BMI in African American women’s health

By: Sally Crocker A new CDC journal article questions the common use of BMI, or Body Mass Index, as a measurement of health for African American women, suggesting instead a more holistic, multifaceted approach to preventing chronic disease and motivating healthy behaviors. African American women have a higher prevalence (82 percent) of being overweight and... Read more »

Jul 5, 2017